Welcome to Radio X’s Best Of British. Since the 1960s, the British Isles have been synonymous with the greatest rock music ever made. But, in the fifty years since the Beatles and the Stones dominated the charts, what has been the BEST BRITISH SONG to have ever been recorded and released? Radio X asked YOU to decide. You voted in your tens of thousands and now we can reveal your Top 100 favourite British Songs Of All Time. The Beatles or The Rolling Stones? Blur or Oasis? Arctic Monkeys or The Stone Roses? The Smiths or Muse? The question is: who’s the greatest? Here’s the countdown…

Here’s the full Top 100 - find out more about each track by clicking on each entry.

  • The best known Oasis song of all, despite Liam Gallagher claiming it initially sounded like a reggae song. While rumoured to be about Noel?s girlfriend Meg Matthews, the real meaning of the lyric remains obscure. although the titled was inspired by the 1968 movie with a George Harrison soundtrack. Famously, this classic was kept off the Number 1 spot in 1995 by TV heart-throbs Robson And Jerome. Listen and find out more.

  • Taken from the monster album (What's The Story) Morning Glory, Don't Look Back In Anger was one of the tracks that awarded them the mantle of Britain's favourite band and winners in the Britpop wars: "Please don't put your life in the hands / of a rock and roll band / who'll throw it all away". Listen and find out more.

  • The closing track from the massive (What's The Story) Morning Glory) album from 1995, this sees Noel Gallagher in a reflective mood: "Some day you will find me / Caught beneath the landslide / In a champagne supernova in the sky." Listen and find out more.

  • "Maybe I don't really want to know how your garden grows? I just want to fly." Conceived as a response to the angst of grunge, this celebration of life was the song Noel Gallagher played to brother Liam as an audition piece. It was the third single to be taken from the landmark 1994 album Definitely Maybe and made Number 10 in the UK charts. Listen and find out more.

  • "Don't waste your words I don't need anything from you / I don't care where you've been or what you plan to do." This near-ten minute epic formed the climax to the debut album by The Stone Roses, which was the result of two days of jamming and recording by the band. In many ways, it kick-started the baggy shuffle of Madchester. Listen and find out more.

  • "Stop making the eyes at me, I'll stop making the eyes at you?" The debut single from the Sheffield band, this was the world's first taste of Alex Turner's down to earth lyrical style in October 2005. It tells the tale of young men in Northern towns and their, er, mating habits. It went straight to Number 1 on the UK singles chart and was included on their first album, Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not. Listen and find out more.

  • "We can be heroes? just for one day." The title track from the ultimate Bowie "Berlin" album was recorded in the West German city in the shadow of the infamous wall. It depicts the crumbling relationship of two lovers, trying for one last stab at reconciliation. Surprisingly, it wasn't a huge hit at the time, but the song's reputation is assured in the wake of Bowie's death in 2016. Listen and find out more.

  • "It's a god-awful small affair / To the girl with the mousy hair." One of Bowie's most poetic lyrics, given a huge boost by Mick Ronson's epic string arrangement and a delicate piano part from Rick Wakeman. When it was released as a single from the Hunky Dory album in 1971, it was one of the key steps along the path to Bowie's superstardom. Listen and find out more.

  • "Cause it's a bittersweet symphony, this life / Trying to make ends meet / You're a slave to money then you die." The leading track from The Verve's iconic Urban Hymns album ran into trouble by sampling Rolling Stones manager Andrew Loog Oldham's orchestral cover of the Jagger/Richards track The Last Time. It was claimed that the track used a significant proportion of the original arrangement and awarded a partial songwriting credit to the two Stones. Listen and find out more.

  • "Oh, a storm is threat'ning / My very life today / If I don't get some shelter /Oh yeah, I'm gonna fade away." This brooding, apocalyptic salvo was unheard of in 1960s songwriting. Keith Richards had been toying with the riff while Mick Jagger was acting in the film Performance. The track was never released as a single, but opened the Stones' legendary Let It Bleed album from 1969. Listen and find out more.

  • Elbow's biggest hit was taken from the conceptual album The Seldom Seen Kid, which details the life of a late friend of the band - the "kid" of the title. The album went on to win the 2008 Barclaycard Mercury Music Prize and established the band as one of Britain's favourite collectives. Listen and find out more.

  • "Is this the real life? Is this just fantasy?" Freddie Mercury brings opera to the masses in one of the most remarkable Number 1 singles ever released. Hours of recording time, dozens of overdubs and the impressive vocal range of Mercury, Brian May and Roger Taylor made this epic six-minute single legendary, spending nine weeks at the top. Listen and find out more.

  • Written by Paul McCartney for John Lennon's estranged son Julian, the finished song was over seven minutes long thanks to the huge fade-out chorus, but the Beatles weren't worried that radio stations wouldn't play it. The single was was a monster hit in August 1968 and the first release on the Fab Four's Apple label, backed with John's storming Revolution. Listen and find out more.

  • "She came from Greece she had a thirst for knowledge." Taken from Pulp's second major label album Different Class, Common People became one of the key Britpop singles of 1995. An attack on "class tourism", the song made Number 2 in the UK charts. Listen and find out more.

  • "And if a double-decker bus / Crashes in to us To die by your side / Is such a heavenly way to die". By 1985, the Marr-Morrissey songwriting partnership was at its peak and, as an example of the form they were in, this was written during the same sessions as Bigmouth Strikes Again. Taken from the classic 1986 album The Queen Is Dead, Morrissey's romantic ode to obsessive love was never released as a single during the band's lifetime. Listen and find out more.

  • "Let me be the one that shines with you / In the morning we don't know what to do". A frequently overlooked classic from the Oasis catalogue, Definitely Maybe's penultimate track is a wistful slow-burner with a sky-scraping chorus. Listen and find out more.

  • A one-off single from November 1989 (backed with What The World Is Waiting For), the full 9.53 version is one of the key "Madchester" tracks. Based on James Brown's Funky Drummer shuffle-beat, it features an incredible performance from Reni on drums and John Squire's free-form wah-wah guitar solo. Mani's nimble bassline holds the whole thing together perfectly. Listen and find oit more.

  • ?I am the son and the heir of a shyness that is criminally vulgar?" Morrissey has a bad night out on this epic Smiths song, which saw Johnny Marr take inspiration from 50s rocker Bo Diddley for the hypnotic tremelo guitar riff that powers the track. Despite all this, record label Rough Trade would only initially release this awesome recording as a b-side. Listen and find out more.

  • The awesome finale to the classic Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band album from 1967, this was a mash up of Lennon's world-weary verses based on newspaper reports, coupled with McCartney's upbeat middle section. The two separate parts were linked by a "musical orgasm", supervised by producer George Martin, who employed a 40-piece orchestra and told each and every member to work their way from their instrument's lowest note to its highest over the course of 24 bars. The Beatles' masterpiece. Listen and find out more.

  • "We're changing our ways / Taking different roads". The 1980 swansong of one of Manchester's most influential bands was released after the suicide of lead singer Ian Curtis. Constant touring was exacerbating his epilepsy, while his marriage was running into trouble. By the time Love With Tear Us Apart made it to number 13 in the UK charts during the June of 1980, Curtis had been dead a month. This devastatingly beautiful song literally became his epitaph. Listen and find out more.

  • This 1966 single marked The Rolling Stones move away from traditional R&B to the darker world of psychedelia, thanks to Brian Jones' use of a sitar: "I see a red door and I want it painted black." Listen and find out more.

  • "And if you listen very hard / The tune will come to you at last / When all are one and one is all / To be a rock and not to roll." Mystical stuff from the British rock gods, taken from their untitled fourth album from 1971. The stuff of rock 'n' roll legend in so many ways, with lots of theories about the lyrics, plus what is supposed to happen if you play the song backwards. Listen and find out more.

  • This song for the "Summer of Love" in 1967 was written especially by John Lennon for a TV special that saw a global satellite link-up different countries and continents for the first time. The lyrics are simple and direct? but hold true to this day. Listen and find out more.

  • Jagger and Richard's satantic samba opened the 1968 album Beggars Banquet in December 1968, but was never issued as a single in the UK in the '60s. They performed it at the ill-fated San Francisco festival Altamont, which saw an audience member murdered by a biker gang. "Something very funny always happens when we start that number," pondered a nervous Mick. Listen and find out more.

  • The greatest song to ever be thrown away on a B-side? Without question. It played second fiddle to Wonderwall, probably the only track in the Oasis catalogue that could (only slightly) put this classic in the shade. Listen and find out more.

  • "You're so f**king special / I wish I was special." The band's first single proper from September 1992 flopped on its initial release, but became a massive radio hit, despite the F-bomb contain within. When it was reissued a year later, it made Number 7, becoming something of a millstone around the band's collective neck. Listen and find out more.

  • "I don't have to sell my soul / He's already in me." The opening track to the Mancunians' debut album, the song was so popular it was later issued as a single in 1991. It was a key song in the development of the psychedelic, slightly retro blend of guitar rock that would become a Manchester trademark. Listen and find out more.

  • The Smiths' second single opens with one of Marr's most distinctive riffs, heralding one of the band's greatest tracks. The cycling guitar part - played on a 1954 Telecaster - is both strident and delicate at the same time. The Mancunian band offered this classic song as their second single in October 1983, boasting one of the best opening lyrics in pop history: "Punctured bicycle on a hillside desolate." Listen and find out more.

  • "Planet Earth is blue / And there's nothing I can do." Bowie had spent most of the 1960s trying to become a pop star, but it was this song, designed to cash in on the Apollo 11 moon landings, that finally made it happen. The single was released ten days before the astronauts touched down on the moon and while the song made the Top 10, but Bowie struggled to follow it up. By the time it was reissued in 1975, he was a superstar and it shot to Number 1. Listen and find out more.

  • Over two years after the release of the band's self-titled debut album, this indie club favourite was released as a belated fourth single, featuring guitarist John Squire's Jackson Pollock-inspired take on the Union Jack as a cover. Listen and find out more.

  • A brilliant track made even better by a snarling Liam Gallagher adding a good few syllables on to the words "imagination" and "action". This was the moment when the voice of a generation stood up to be counted. The song made Number 7 in the charts in October 1994. Listen and find out more.

  • "There's a starman waiting in the sky / He'd like to come and meet us / But he thinks he'd blow our minds." This wistful ode to alien influences almost didn't make it onto the Ziggy Stardust album, but its effect on the youth of Great Britain was immeasurable. Bowie's 1972 appearance on Top Of The Pops performing this song prompted thousands to experiment with clothes, make-up, sexuality and music. Listen and find out more.

  • The lead single from Adele's long-awaited third album, 25, Hello was an enormous success for the singer-songwriter from London, selling over a million digital copies in a week and making this her second UK Number 1 after Someone Like You. Listen and find out more.

  • "Confidence is a preference for the habitual voyeur of what is known as?" Originally recorded with Damon Albarn performing all the parts, this song became a Britpop classic when Quadrophenia actor Phil Daniels was enlisted. The song - accompanied by a hilarious video - became the title track to the band's acclaimed 1994 album. Listen and find out more.

  • "You may say I'm a dreamer / But I'm not the only one." The title track of Lennon's 1971 solo album, this song became the former Beatle's epitaph after his murder in 1980. Based on his wife Yoko Ono's conceptual poems, it's a tribute to positive thinking to achieve real change and was written when John was becoming politically active. A simple piano melody is sweetened by producer Phil Spector's cinematic strings. Listen and find out more.

  • This epic track closes the Teignmouth trio's 2006 album Black Holes And Revelations. It may be a work of sprawling imagination, but the band has never sounded more accomplished than they do here. "No one's gonna take me alive? the time has come to make things right." Listen and find out more.

  • "My plug in baby / Crucifies my enemies / When I'm tired of giving". The standout track from the Devon trio's second album Origin Of Symmetry, Plug In Baby was the track that put Muse on the map for good and made Number 11 in the UK charts in 2001. Listen and find out more.

  • "Why don't you all f... fade away?" The band's highest charting single from 1965, and a bona fide Mod anthem. Pete Townshend has offered many differing anecdotes to explain My Generation's genesis. One of the best (if not the most likely) is that it was written after the Queen Mother had his car, a hearse, towed away from his Belgravia home for being unsightly. Listen and find out more.

  • "Better stop dreaming of the quiet life / 'Cos it's the one we'll never know". A Town Called Malice is a rebel cry from Weller written about the tough deal for families in his hometown of Woking under the Thatcher government of the time. A double A-side with Precious in January 1982, it was taken from the final album from the band, The Gift. Listen and find out more.

  • "Over there there's broken bones / There's only music, so that there's new ringtones." The final track on the impressive 2006 debut album Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not, A Certain Romance is perhaps the best example of the way in which Arctic Monkeys fused rock, punk, and ska alongside Alex Turner's witty lyrics to create their unique sound. Listen and find out more.

  • Mostly written by David Gilmour on the Roger Waters-dominated The Wall, Comfortably Numb still stands as one of The Floyd's finest moments. The glacial place echoes the protagonist's discussions with a doctor, which forms part of the concept album. Its reputation survived a disco remake by the Scissor Sisters in the noughties. Listen and find out more.

  • "Don't cry / Don't raise your eye / It's only teenage wasteland." Originally written for Pete Townshend's aborted Lifehouse project, this was the lead track from the 1971 Who's Next album. Baba O'Riley's stadium rock style was partially offset by Townshend's use of In C by minimalist composer Terry Riley as inspiration for the song. Riley is there in the title, the other half being a reference to Meher Baba, Townshend's spiritual guru at the time. Listen and find out more.

  • The title track of the Floyd's ninth album relates to the over-arching theme of absence and Roger Waters later claimed the lyrics were about his grandmother's later years. The sighing introspection of the music sums up the mundane tragedy perfectly. Listen and find oit more.

  • "You made me feel like the one." Following the departure of original drummer Stuart Cable, Stereophonics bounced back with this triumphant single, which became their first UK Number 1. The track is taken from their fifth album Language. Violence. Sex. Other? and also gave the band some much-needed airplay in the US. Listen and find out more.

  • "How does it feel? To treat me like you do." The biggest-selling 12" in history, this dancefloor monster took New Order out of the shadow of their previous incarnation as Joy Division in 1983. Packaged in a memorably-expensive sleeve by Peter Saville, it made electronic music human again. Listen and find out more.

  • This semi-religious tune was written by Paul McCartney after he had a dream in which his dead mother told him to stop worrying about the business and personal difficulties that were complicating his life with The Beatles and their company Apple. Originally recorded in 1969, it was released a year later when it became the title track of the band's final album and accompanying movie. Listen and find out more.

  • "I got my head checked, by a jumbo jet?" Woo hoo! This storming thrash-a-thon from the band's 1997 self-titled album was one of Blur's most successful and iconic singles. It was written in just ten minutes! Listen and find out more.

  • "And they'll never forgive you but they wont let you go, oh no." Based around the songwriting duo of Carl Barat and Pete Doherty, the Libertines released this stand-alone single in the summer of 2003. It was produced by none other than Bernard Butler, former guitarist with Britpop heroes Suede. Listen and find out more.

  • Co-written between Adele Adkins and her producer Paul Epworth, this feisty song about a spurned lover was the first single from her 21 album and quickly became a huge hit. Released at the end of 2010, America took Adele into their hearts and sent this track to the top of the Billboard Hot 100. Listen and find out more.

  • Is this the birth of trip-hop unfolding around our ears? We think so. The sound of Bristol turning to face the world's spotlight, taken from the band's 1991 debut album Blue Lines and featuring the incredible vocals of Shara Nelson. Listen and find out more.

  • This was a Noel Gallagher song that was released as a single between the epic Definitely Maybe and the titanic What's The Story in December 1994. The opening line bore a similarity to the melody of a song called How Sweet To Be An Idiot, which comedian/musician Neil Innes wrote in 1973 and performed at some of Monty Python's live shows. His publishers jumped in and claimed a piece of the publishing - which was unfortunate as this was the first Oasis single to break into the Top 5. Listen and find out more.

  • "Now then Mardy Bum/ I see your frown / And it's like looking down the barrel of a gun?" Using some great Yorkshire colloquialisms, this track was included on the band's 2006 debut album Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not. It wasn't released as a single, yet remains a live favourite. Listen and find out more.

  • Named after Marvin, the morose robot from Douglas Adams' The Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy, this was the lead single from the classic OK Computer album in May 1997. Despite its challenging time signature changes and six-minutes-plus length, it made Number 3 in the UK. Listen and find out more.

  • "Sent to me from heaven / Sally Cinnamon, you're my world." Once the Stone Roses had made it big in 1989, their back catalogue was plundered for more gems. Originally released in May 1987, Sally Cinnamon was recorded before Mani had joined the band and pre-dated their signing to the Silvertone label. More of a straightforward indie guitar song than the debut album would offer, it quickly became a favourite among fans. Listen and find out more.

  • "But I crumble completely when you cry, / It seems like once again you've had to greet me with goodbye." Another Monkeys album track that has installed itself into the hearts of the nation, this emotionally-challenging song rounds off the band's second album, Favourite Worst Nightmare, released in 2007. Listen and find out more.

  • The second single from Adele's 2008 debut album, 19, this moving song was about the futility of dead-end relationships. It certainly hit a nerve with the public, who sent it to Number 2 in the UK charts. Listen and find out more.

  • "My mama said to get things done / You better not mess with Major Tom." A belated follow-up to Space Oddity, this 1980 classic was Bowie's farewell to the 70s, reviving his "strung out" character from a decade earlier and making a fantastic video that reinvented the whole medium. A loyal Britain sent it to Number 1 and the New Romantic movement took a few notes. Listen and find out more.

  • Ray Davies's ode to London's South Bank was a Number 2 hit in May 1967 and apparently concerned actors Terence Stamp and Julie Christie. It was included on the band's acclaimed album Something Else By The Kinks. Listen and find out more.

  • "You're not nineteen forever, pull yourself together." Liam Fray's call for listeners to seize the day was taken from the Courteeners' acclaimed debut album St Jude and made number 19 in the singles charts. Listen and find out more.

  • "It only takes one tree to make a thousand matches / It only takes one match to burn a thousand trees." A phrase from the back of a box of England's Glory matches was coupled with the story of a local football coach whose career ended in scandal. This typically observational Kelly Jones lyric led off the Welsh band's debut album Word Gets Around in 1997. Listen and find out more.

  • "The past was yours, but the future's mine." The second single from the band's self-titled debut and first top 40 single, making Number 34 during the Second Summer Of Love in 1989. A gleaming pop song, this was released just as the band's debut album had started garnering the acclaim that would make them one of Britain's biggest bands. Listen and find out more.

  • "Happiness, more or less / It's just a change in me, something in my liberty." The third single to be taken from the excellent Urban Hymns album, apparently Lucky Man is one of six songs U2's Bono had wished he'd written. It made Number 7 in November 1997.

  • "Because we need each other / We believe in one another." Another great Oasis B-side masquerading as an A-side, the flip side to the Number 1 single Some Might Say in 1995 saw both Liam and Noel Gallagher share the vocal duties. The track was also issued as a single to promote the Oasis compilation The Masterplan. Listen and find out more.

  • "We don't talk about love / We only want to get drunk." A statement of intent following the disappearance of guitarist Richey Edwards, A Design For Life made Number 2 in 1996 and marks one of the greatest triumphs over adversity in musical history. Listen and find out more.

  • After success with their albums Gold Mother and Seven, the Manchester band employed producer Brian Eno for a more experimental sound. On the title track of their 1993 LP, some radio stations switched the risque line: "This bed is on fire with passionate love / The neighbours complain about the noises above / But she only comes when she's on top." Listen and find out more.

  • Proving that Run was no fluke, Gary Lightbody clearly still had an ear for a stadium-filling ballad with Chasing Cars. The Snow Patrol phenomenon went stellar when this was released as a single from the band's fourth album, Eyes Open, in 2006. Listen and find out more.

  • "For Each A Road / For Everyman A Religion?" Inspired by an autobiography of civil rights activist Malcolm X, the former Stone Roses man took a quiet moment on tour to create acronyms for the word "fear": F.E.A.R. The resulting single was released in 2001 and is one of King Monkey's most successful. Listen and find out more.

  • "London calling: yes, I was there, too / And you know what they said? Well, some of it was true". The title track to the classic double album, the single made Number 11 in the UK charts in December 1979. Listen and find out more.

  • "Lights will guide you home / And ignite your bones / And I will try to fix you." A tender moment from 2005's X&Y album, which made Number 4 in the UK charts when released as a single. Listen and find out more.

  • "What a scummy man / Just give him half a chance / I bet he'll rob you if he can." Originally titled Scummy, the band's follow up single to I Bet You Look Good On The Dancefloor confirmed the hype around the Sheffield four-piece. It went straight to number 1 in the UK charts in 2006, paving the way for the debit album Whatever People Say I Am, That's What I'm Not. Listen and find out more.

  • "Put on your red shoes and dance the blues." The 1970s had seen Bowie become a teen idol, soul man and avant garde artist all in the space of a few years. Now he wanted to become a stadium pop star and employed Chic man Nile Rodgers to produce his latest LP. The album's title track was a monster production, coupled with a memorable video featuring a bleached-blond superstar Bowie remodelled for the 80s. Listen and find out more.

  • "I need to be myself / I can't be no one else / I'm feeling supersonic / Give me gin and tonic." Liam 'n' Noel's first official single, released in April 1994 and included on their debut album Definitely Maybe. Listen and find out more.

  • "All your dreams are made / When you're chained to the mirror and the razor blade." With its helicopter sound effect opening and blatant drug references, this one song sums up the confidence and the swagger of Britpop in 1995. The title track to the vinyl behemoth that was the band's second album, (What's The Story) Morning Glory?, it was claimed that within a year of its release, one in five UK households owned a copy. Listen and find out more.

  • "Look at the stars, look how they shine for you?" Inspired by the clear night skies in Wales where Coldplay's first album was recorded, Yellow brought the band to the world's attention back in 2000, making an impressive Number 4 in the UK charts. Listen and find out more.

  • "Time may change me / But I can't trace time." For a man who was classed as a "chameleon", Changes was seen as something of a theme song. Recorded for 1971's Hunky Dory album and released as a single in January 1972, it remains one of his most finely-crafted pieces. Listen and find out more.

  • "Sometimes I fantasise / When the streets are cold and lonely / And the cars they burn below me." Released in February 1989 as a teaser for the forthcoming debut album, this was one of The Stone Roses' most enigmatic songs. They memorably performed it live on BBC 2's Late Show, only to have a power cut stop them in mid-flow. Listen and find out more.

  • Originally planned as a campaign song for psychedelic guru Timothy Leary on his quest to become a politician, it wound up as the opening track of the last Beatles album to be recorded: 1969's Abbey Road. Surprisingly funky, and with an intriguing Lennon lyric, it later came back to haunt him when legal action was taken over some "borrowed" phrases. Listen and find out more.

  • "Oh that boy's a slag / The best you ever had." Taken from the band's second album, Favourite Worst Nightmare (2007), this is another musing on life and getting older as seen by singer and lyricist Alex Turner, who co-wrote the song with his girlfriend Johanna Bennett. Listen and find out more.

  • Included on 1965's Rubber Soul album, this reflective song began life as John Lennon taking a trip through his old stomping ground of Liverpool. It turned into something more introspective, with stories of "friends and lovers", accompanied by a baroque George Martin piano solo. Lennon would revisit his home town again the following year on the classic Strawberry Fields Forever. Listen and find out more.

  • Strident string action from the essential Revolver LP from 1966, this was a surprisingly bleak song for Paul McCartney, and like Yesterday before it, producer George Martin thought that a full band arrangement would be a bit too heavy. His arrangement for a string octet was inspired by the famous film composer Bernard Hermann (best known for the shrieking violins of Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho) and the finished score is suitably icy. Listen and find out more.

  • "I need to sleep, although I get no sleep." A dance monster from Maxi Jazz, Sister Bliss and Rollo Armstrong, which peaked at Number 3 in the UK charts in 1996. It was also a key track on the band's debut album, Reverence. Listen and find out more.

  • "Let's all meet up in the year 2000 / Won't it be strange when we're all fully grown?" With the Millennium bearing down on him, Jarvis Cocker recalls his childhood crush Deborah. Based on an actual person, the real Deborah died at the tragically young age of 51, adding a layer of poignancy not present when this track made Top 10 in 1995. Listen and find out more.

  • "I know Saint Peter won't call my name, never an honest word? But that was when I ruled the world." The title track of Coldplay's 2008 album Viva La Vida was produced by the legendary Brian Eno and made number 1 in both the US and UK - a first for the band. Listen and find out more

  • From the band's third album Absolution, the song made Number 17 in the UK charts and was later used in a perfume ad: "I want you now I'll feel my heart implode?" Listen and find out more.

  • "The distant echo of faraway voices boarding faraway trains..." Down In The Tube Station is arguably one one of Weller's most accomplished songs, telling the story of a vicious mugging that takes place on the London Underground. The second single from All Mod Cons in 1978, it featured a cover of The Who's So Sad About Us on the B-side as a tribute to Keith Moon, who'd died a couple of months earlier. Listen and find out more.

  • Although written a long time before it was a hit, when Club Foot finally landed in 2004, it was bigger than anything the band could have imagined. Kasabian proved that there was still a market for gun-slinging guitar music. The Leicester lads dedicated this stomper to Czech student Jan Palach, who committed suicide as a political protest. Listen and find out more.

  • "I wanna hold her, wanna hold her tight / Get teenage kicks right through the night." John Peel's favourite record, this was the debut single from the Northern Irish punks, but only made Number 31 in the charts at the time. Listen and find out more.

  • "That's the way I like it baby / I don't wanna live forever." The late, lamented Lemmy fronted this punk-meets-metal trio, and this is their calling card, so to speak. It was released in October 1980 as a preview of the band's album of the same name and peaked at NUmber 15 in the UK charts. It made a memorable appearance in the "Bambi" episode of TV comedy series The Young Ones. Listen and find out more.

  • "I would like to leave this city / This old town don't smell too pretty." Now best known as the theme music to domestic comedy The Royle Family, Noel said that this tune was influenced by Burt Bacharach's song This Guy's In Love With You. First released as the B-side to Whatever in December 1994, it's since taken on a life of its own. Listen and find out more.

  • Fed up with the constant meetings about The Beatles' struggling Apple company, George Harrison skived off one Spring morning and hid in a garden that belonged to his friend Eric Clapton. The change of season inspired him to write this shining, bright guitar song that appeared on 1969's Abbey Road album. Listen and find out more.

  • This Jagger/Richards collaboration from May 1965 was The Stones' first number one in the US, with its tale of dissatisfied youth bolstered by an incredible distorted guitar riff. Listen and find out more.

  • "Watching the people get lairy / It's not very pretty I tell thee?" Kaiser Chiefs' second single was released in 2004 and was inspired by drummer Nick Hodgson's time as a DJ in Leeds city centre. The song reached Number 22 in the charts on its initial release, but when reissued a year later, it broke the Top 10 and quickly shot the band to stardom. Listen and find out more.

  • Backed with Dreams Of Children, this classic Weller call to arms went straight to No 1 in March 1980 - not an easy feat in a time when sales of singles were at an all-time high. The track didn't appear on an album, falling between the release of Setting Sons and Sound Affects. Listen and find out more.

  • The lead single from 2013's AM album, this sly track showed off the grungier, darker Arctic Monkeys sound that was prompted by recording in Joshua Tree, California where Josh Homme of Queens Of The Stone Age would stop by. "Do I wanna know? if this feeling flows both ways?" muses a cautious Alex Turner in a complex tale of relationships. Listen and find out more.

  • Following rejection after rejection, Stereophonics were all set to call it a day until the new label V2 signed them in 1997. The rest is history and Local Boy In The Photograph was a standout song from their first album. It tells the grim but mundane story of a local lad who was killed by a train near the town where Kelly Jones lived. Listen and find out more.

  • An unlikely hit single from Roger Waters' ultra-personal, ominous masterwork The Wall. An album about alienation spawned a single about the struggles of education, complete with Cockney kids chorus and a surprisingly danceable beat from the band. It was the last UK Number 1 of the 1970s. Listen and find out more.

  • "All we want from you are the kicks you've given us." A melodic moment from the early Manics, taken from their debut album Generation Terrorists. Despite their confrontational stance and occasional battles with the press, the track made Number 17 in the UK charts in the summer of 1992. Listen and find out more.

  • "I live my life in the city / There ain't no easy way out." The first song on the first Oasis album, this set out the band's stall nicely. Noel Gallagher later said: "I pretty much summed up everything I wanted to say in Rock 'N' Roll Star, Live Forever and Cigarettes And Alcohol: after that, I'm repeating myself." Listen and find out more.

  • "I am an anti-Christ / I am an anarchist, / Don't know what I want / But I know how to get it." The only song the EMI label released by the band and one of punk's first, and most fiery, singles. Things would never be the same again after this song hit the shops in November 1976. Listen and find out more.

  • "Glaciers melting in the dead of night / And the superstars sucked into the supermassive." Taken from Muse's fourth album Black Holes And Revelations, and released as the lead single in June 2006, it's since featured in the film Twilight and the game Guitar Hero III. Listen and find out more.